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Culture

A green land of sensations.

Slovenes have one of the most persistent national histories in Europe. More than anything, the present-day national state was shaped by their headstrong persistence with the national language. Even though the language is very diverse and has 46 listed dialects, it is the only thing that was and still is present from the first foundations of the country in the 7th century.

Almost every Slovenian is by nature a writer, painter, cook, dancer, wine-maker, musician, director, actor, blogger or engraver. Slovenians know how to create art out of everything they love. In addition to artists with various skills and crafts that have been handed down from generation to generation, Slovenians are also successful in many modern art forms accessible to all generations.

Cultural events are unbelievably well attended – various festivals, especially in the summer months, thrill visitors who come from near and far. Theatres and concerts are popular; Slovenians love to read and are proud of their cultural tradition.

For more on Slovenian culture you can visit:
www.slovenia.si or www.culture.si

Dr. France Prešeren

The poet France Prešeren created not only the first example of a highly developed literary language, but laid the spiritual foundations of modern Slovenian identity with his liberal world view. With him Slovenes became an integral part of high European culture. He is also the author of the Slovenian national anthem, Zdravljica. The anthem appeals for the coexistence of nations and is a toast to all people of good heart.

God's blessing on all nations,
Who long and work for that bright day,
When o'er earth's habitations
No war, no strife shall hold its sway,
Who long to see
That all men free
No more shall foes, but neighbours be.

Text of the Slovenian national anthem
(7th stanza of Zdravljica – A Toast by France Prešeren)

Jože Plečnik

The famous architect Jože Plečnik left a special mark on the capital, Ljubljana and a few other smaller towns and villages. Previously working in Vienna and Prague, Plečnik knew how to combine Classicism with Modernism. From libraries, office buildings, cemeteries and stadiums to landscaping, riverside embankments and market halls, Plečnik left his mark everywhere. In his art he thoughtfully incorporated people, nature, the Slovenian heritage, town vistas and symbolism into his works.

Slavko Avsenik

Slavko Avsenik is a Slovenian composer and musician. His career accomplishments place him at the world-wide pinnacle of success among ethnic popular musicians in over 40 years. His ensemble’s original “Oberkrainer” sound became the primary vehicle of ethnic musical expressions for Slovenia, Germany, Austria, Switzerland and Benelux countries, spanning hundreds of Alpine orchestras in the process. Selling over 30 million records, they have earned 31 Gold, 2 Diamond and 1 Platinum record. With his brother Vilko, they produced nearly 1 000 original compositions. The most popular song of their sound is polka titled “Na Golici” or “Trumpet Echoes” in English, which is the most played instrumental song in the world.


Tourism

Europe's best kept secret.

For its size, Slovenia is extremely diverse. The landscape changes almost all the time due to its climate position. The added bonus is also the clash of ethnicities, which adds a flavour to this small country on every corner. Travelling through Slovenia from W to E and N to S doesn’t take longer than 3 hours – but it feels like you have been all over the world. The areas like mountains and lakes, cities and medieval towns, magnificent underground world and Mediterranean coastline, wine roads and farm villages, together with numerous spas take your breath away. Beside that, the country is also the second most forested country in Europe, and as much as 58% is covered in green forests. This feature is not taken for granted so each year there is over 1.2 million tree seedlings planted. Flora and fauna are full of surprises too – as many as 3 000 species of ferns and seed- bearing plants have been recorder so far. About 36% of Slovenia’s surface area falls within protected zones. We are proud of our magnificent Triglav National Park, three regional parks and 40 landscape parks. Slovenia is also the only member of European Union that has protected its native bee known as the Carniolian grey bee. This is the land of water - in addition to 27 000 km of watercourses and numerous thermal springs, two mineral springs also rise in Slovenia. And you can drink water right from the tap. Slovenia surely is worth a visit – and there are places and things you shouldn’t miss.

Castle

The Karst: dry-stone villages and a mysterious subterranean world of rivers, streams and caverns.

Logarska Valley: impossibly picturesque glacial valley carpeted with meadows and forests and hemmed in by the raw peaks of the Kamnik-Savinja Alps.

Gibanica: stuffed with cottage cheese, poppy seeds, walnuts and apples, this irresistible sweet pie from Prekmurje, is the ultimate Slovene dessert.

Wine: from the sunny Goriška Brda hills in the west to the beautiful Ljutomer – Ormož vineyards in the east, Slovenia possesses some terrific wine growing regions. The oldest grapevine in the world has been preserved here – a more than 400-year-old black velvet. Through the three wine-growing regions of Slovenia and their characteristic wines run more than 20 wine roads.

Ljubljana’s Old Town: enjoy fabulous Baroque and Habsburg architecture, a hilltop castle and leafy riverside cafes in the enchanting Slovene capital.

Franja Partisan hospital: once a clandestine World War II hospital, this is now a fine memorial museum.

Pršut: the delicious dry-cured ham from the Karst goes down a treat with a drop of the local Teran wine.

Soča valley: snow-dusted peaks, a magical river and a raft of historical sites combine to make this a truly memorable place.

Lake Bohinj: encircled by majestic mountains, Bohinj is the pearl of the Alpine lakes, less visited and more serene than Lake Bled.

Lake Bled: fairytale lake, complete with island church and atmospheric, millennium old castle – take a dip, a stroll or just a kick back on a pletna boat.

Škocjan caves: carved out by the thrashing Reka River, the world’s largest underground canyon is Slovenia’s most amazing natural wonder.

Postojna caves: Slovenia’s oldest and most visited caves with spectacular cave formations and some of world’ largest stalagmites and stalactites.

Ptuj Kurent Festival: Slovenia’s most vibrant and entertaining winter spectacle, featuring spooky masked figures dressed in chunky costumes, parading through town.

Hiking in the Julian Alps: one of Europe’s most stunning and least spoilt mountain ranges, these mountain wilds are Slovenia’s prime hiking region, with trails to suit walkers of all abilities.

Skiing: take your pick from over twenty ski resorts, with slopes and facilities to suit all abilities. Or enjoy the winter spectacles by attending the World Cup races in either Kranjska Gora or Maribor.

Lent Festival in Maribor: two vibrant weeks of music, theatre and art around the squares, streets and waterfront district of Slovenia’s second largest city.

Piran: an atmospheric coastal resort strewn with gorgeous Gothic-Venetian architecture, pretty little churches and quaint squares.

Cycling: from the tough-going mountain climbs across the Julian Alps and Koroška, to the less demanding trails in Dolenjska and Prekmurje, Slovenia’s countryside presents endless cycling possibilities.

Ptuj and other medieval towns: Slovenia’s oldest and most appealing town Ptuj is run through with over two thousand years of history. Other towns worth exploring are Škofja Loka, Radovljica, Kamnik, Celje, Kranj, etc..

Predjama castle: dramatically sited castle with a labyrinth of rooms, secret passages and underground caves.

Planica ski-jumping: enjoy daring feats, beer and music at one of world’s great ski-jumping venues.

Adventure sports on the Soča: this fabulous, foaming river is a first-rate venue for any number of adventure sports, from white-water rafting, kayaking and canoeing to hydro speed.

Lipica stud farm: see where Lipizzaner horses come from and enjoy in the magnificent show of these majestic animals.

Arts and crafts of Slovenia: explore the secrets behind blacksmithing, shepherding, beekeeping, gingerbread making, making laces, decorating Easter eggs, brandy cooking, herb and flower picking, mushrooming, glass blowing, etc..


Gastronomy

Food. Wine. Excellence.

For its size, Slovenia is extremely diverse. The landscape changes almost all the time due to its climate position. The added bonus is also the clash of ethnicities, which adds a flavour to this small country on every corner. Travelling through Slovenia from W to E and N to S doesn’t take longer than 3 hours – but it feels like you have been all over the world. The areas like mountains and lakes, cities and medieval towns, magnificent underground world and Mediterranean coastline, wine roads and farm villages, together with numerous spas take your breath away. Beside that, the country is also the second most forested country in Europe, and as much as 58% is covered in green forests. This feature is not taken for granted so each year there is over 1.2 million tree seedlings planted. Flora and fauna are full of surprises too – as many as 3 000 species of ferns and seed- bearing plants have been recorder so far. About 36% of Slovenia’s surface area falls within protected zones. We are proud of our magnificent Triglav National Park, three regional parks and 40 landscape parks. Slovenia is also the only member of European Union that has protected its native bee known as the Carniolian grey bee. This is the land of water - in addition to 27 000 km of watercourses and numerous thermal springs, two mineral springs also rise in Slovenia. And you can drink water right from the tap. Slovenia surely is worth a visit – and there are places and things you shouldn’t miss.

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